Jesus is that kid who colors outside the lines (how about giving him the crayons?)

Are you one of those who colors inside the lines or outside? It can make a huge difference in your relationship with God.

When I was in fourth grade, I was both surprised and proud to win an elementary school coloring contest. Each student was given a white sheet of paper with an outline of the American flag and equipped with a red crayon and a blue crayon. As a winner, I received an American flag to fly outside our house on holidays. Pretty fitting for a guy whose birthday is on traditional Memorial Day (May 30). :-)

The thing is, I won because I colored inside the lines. My shading was consistent, and my page was virtually mistake-free.

As a person making adult decisions, I default to the spaces inside the lines, but I get restless there.
Things are more comfortable when they make sense and I can predict how one step is going to follow another. I like a feeling of control. And yet I want things to be bigger and more impactful than what I can control. This is part of my development as a disciples of Jesus. Coloring inside the lines is not the greatest approach to being a disciple of Jesus.

Jesus said to follow him. Attach ourselves to him. Walk with him. Unconditionally. Fearlessly. Sacrificially. Inside the lines and outside the lines.

The thing is, Jesus has a wild streak.

He's not the kid who is going to color strictly inside the lines. He will use funky colors. He will make bold strokes across the paper. At first it will look strange, but when we step back, we will see a picture of striking and unexpected beauty.

Suggestion: Give Jesus the crayons this weekend. Commit yourself to listen to him in the day-to-day stuff of life. Be ready for surprises. Expect to be challenged. Trust that he knows the picture he is trying to craft in and through you. It doesn't have to make sense now. You will see the beauty later.

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